MCFD Training Session #1

Duncan Training Session

Prince Rupert Training Session

Burnaby Training Session

Kelowna training trailer

The Fish Soup for the Indigenous Soul and the ICWRN hold training sessions in Kelowna B.C. this July.  Shanne and Catherine had a great time presenting with Jennifer Lewis-Houde from the Okanagan Nation Alliance.  The traditional two day session talked extensively about research and how to better the policies and procedures to help strengthen our communities.

The kelowna trailer has been edited, but the larger film will take a few more weeks to create, as the content needs to be extracted from roughly 8 hours of footage.

…I have never witnessed such a great bunch of people willing to courageously share about topics that bring floods of emotion at any given time.  The interviews I received had tears and laughter and a lasting impression that change is inevitable  –

Videographer and editor Kelly Seaman ICWRN

 

Tsawout Training Film

The  ICWRN co-facilitated the Tsawout Training Sessions this July with the Tsawout Nation on Vancouver Island.  The theme for the two day learning and teaching began with a kind and generous dinner with Tsawout Elders, facilitators and youth who all joined with the ICWRN to create a healthy and caring environment for the days to come.

Dr. Jacquie Green

Project Manager:

PH.D, BSW, MPA, Director, School of Social Work, University of Victoria

Video from the University’s “Faces of UVIC Research.”

Jacquie Green:

 

Abstracts

Green, Jacquie

Green, J. (2008). Decolonizing social work practice through Oolichan fishing. In R. Sinclair and G. Bruyere (Eds.), Indigenous Social Work

in Canada: Perspectives, Practice, Futures. Fernwood Press. (in press).

Thomas, R. & Green, J. (2008). Indigenous Children in the Centre: Indigenous perspectives on anti- oppressive child welfare perspectives.

In Strega, S. & Carrier, J. (Eds), Walking this Path Together: Anti-oppressive practice in child welfare. Halifax: Fernwood Publishing.

Green, J., Ormiston, T., Thomas, R. & Richardson, C. (2008). Indigenous Specializations: Dreams, Development, Delivery and vision

(School of Social Work, University of Victoria in Canada) Peer Reviewed Paper and Presentation at World Indigenous Peoples Conference

for Education (WIPCE) December, 2008

Green, J., Kovach, M., Montgomery, H., Thomas, R., and Brown, L. (2007). Witnessing wild woman: Resistance and resilience in Aboriginal

child welfare. In Foster, L., & Wharf, B. (Eds.), People, Politics and Child Welfare in B.C. UBC Press: Vancouver.

See abstract for above article here Link to publisher for book here

Green, J. (2007). Reclaiming Haisla Ways: remembering oolichan fishing. Canadian Journal of Native Education. (in press)

Dumbrill, G. C. & Green, J. (2007). Indigenous Knowledge in the Social Work Academy. Social Work Education, The International Journal.

Dumbrill, G. C., & Rice-Green, J. (2007). Including Indigenous knowledge in web-based learning. Journal of Technology in Human Services,

25. The Haworth Press Inc.

Thomas, R. and Green, J. (2007). A way of life: Indigenous perspectives on anti oppressive living. First Peoples Child & Family Review. A

journal on Innovation and Best Practices in Aboriginal Child Welfare Administration, Research, Policy & Practice. 3(1). 91 – 104.

See abstract for above articel here See link to full article here

Rice-Green, J., & Dumbrill, G. C. (2005). A child welfare course for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students: Pedagogical and technical

challenges. Journal of Technology in Human Services. 23. The Haworth Press, Inc.

See abstract for above article here

Green, J. and Thomas, R. (2005). Learning through our children, healing for our children: Best practice in First Nations communities. In

Lena Dominelli (Ed), Communities in a Globalising World: Theory and Practice for Community Empowerment. UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Green, J. (2003). Indigenous peoples and social work – As our journey in perspectives comes to a close… We can reflect upon our

experience and what now awaits us. British Columbia Association of Social Workers Perspectives 2003: First Nations Edition, 25 (2).

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Dr. Leslie Brown

Leslie Brown, a smiling member of the ICWRN

Dr. Leslie Brown, PhD

Special Advisor to the Provost on Community Engagement.  Director, Institute for Studies & Innovation in Community-University Engagement – University of Victoria.

Leslie’s research practice has two major and intersecting themes – child welfare and Indigenous communities. In addition, she is currently working on a project exploring the relationship between sex workers and their families. Leslie also teaches research in the Indigenous Masters of Social Work program and is the co-editor of Research as Resistance: Critical, Indigenous and Anti-Oppressive Approaches. Of settler ancestry, she has lived on the territory of the Lekwammen people for 30 years.

Email:

 

“Honour is given to all who are a part of this change.”- Dr. Leslie Brown – ICWRN

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Dr. Jeannine Carrière

Associate Professor, School of Social Work, University of Victoria.

Jeannine is Métis originally from the Red River area of southern Manitoba. Her teaching experience is in areas such as Indigenous child and family services and other Indigenous content courses. Her research interests include Indigenous child and family practice and policy, Indigenous ways of knowing, mental health and decolonization for Indigenous people.

Dr. Jeannine Carrière discusses research on cultural planning, adoption and Aboriginal children, that looks at ways to keep children connected with their communities and in turn maintain their Indigenous identities.

Video from the University’s “Faces of UVIC Research.”

Jeannine Carriere:

Abstracts

Carriere, J. (2010). Maintaining Identities: The Soul Work of Adoption. In (Ed)
Carriere, J. Aski Awasis: Children of the Earth- First Peoples Speaking  on
 Adoption. Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.
 
Carriere, J. (2010). YTSA Families: Their Experiences and Recommendations. In (Ed) Carriere, J. Aski Awasis: Children of the Earth-First Peoples Speaking  on Adoption.Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.
 
Carriere, J. (2010). The Circle of Connectedness for Aboriginal Children. In (Ed)
Carriere, J. Aski Awasis: Children of the Earth-First Peoples Speaking  on Adoption. Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.
 
Carriere, J. (2010). Community and Culture: The Heart of the YTSA Open and Custom Adoption Program. In (Ed.). Aski Awasis: Children of the Earth-First
Peoples Speaking on Adoption. Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.

Carriere, J., Richardson, C. (2009). A Drop of Longing: Attachment Theory, the Indian Act and Indigneous Children in Canada. In Passion for Action. Regina: Prairie Child Welfare Consortium. In press.

See abstract for above article here.

Strega, S., Carriere, J. (Eds) (2009). Walking this Path Together: Anti-Racist and Anti-Oppressive Child Welfare. Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.

Carriere, J., Sinclair, R. (2009). Considerations for Cultural Planning in Aboriginal Adoptions. In Strega S, Carriere, J. (Eds), Walking this Path Together.Anti-Oppresive Child Welfare. Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.

Bastien, B., Carriere, J. Strega, S. (2009). Treatment vs. Healing: Substance Use and Aboriginal Families Involved in Child Welfare. In Strega, S., Carriere, J. (Eds), Walking This Path Together: Anti-Oppressive Child Welfare. Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.

Strega, S., Carriere, J. (2009). Introduction. In Strega, S., Carriere, J. (Eds), Walking This Path Together, Anti-Oppressive Child Welfare.Winnipeg: Fernwood Press.

Carriere, J. (2008). Indigenous Women, Adoption and Connection to Womanhood. In J. AlterNative. New Zealand. 4(1). In press.

Carriere, J. (2008). Maintaining Identities: The Soul Work of Adoption and Aboriginal Children. In J. Pimatisiwin, A Journal of Indigenous and Aboriginal Community Health. Spring, 2008. 6(1).

See abstract for above article hereLink to full article here

Carriere, J. (2007). Maintaining Identities in First Nation Adoption. First Peoples Child and Family Review. January 2007. 3(1). 46-64.

Carriere, J., Scarth, S. (2007). Aboriginal Children Maintaining Connections. In Brown, I., Chaze. F., Fuchs, D., Lafrance, J., McKay, S., & Thomas Prokop, S. (Eds.), Putting a human face on child welfare: Voices from the prairies. (pp. 203-221). Regina: Prairie Child Welfare Consortium.

Carriere, Jeannine (2007). Promising practice for maintaining identities in First Nation adoption. First Peoples Child & Family Review. Vol. 3 pp 46 – 64,

See abstract for above article here

Carriere, J. (2005). Connectedness and Health for First Nation Adoptees. Paediatrics and Child Health. November, 2005. 10 (9). 545-548.

 

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Shanne McCaffrey

Professor at the School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria.

Shanne has a background in education, law and social services. Shanne has Cree/Métis ancestry and attended the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Victoria. Her academic interests include child welfare, colonialism as a shared experience and Aboriginal community development.

Email: 

Abstracts

McCaffrey, S. (2010) Kookum Knew…Exploring Historical Contexts: Aboriginal People, the Justice System, and Child Welfare. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 1(3/4), pp. 340-347.

See abstract for above article here